Hardesty Cemetery Clean-up

Matt (left) and Frank Chiurco discuss the progress of the day.
Matt (left) and Frank Chiurco discuss the progress of the day.
Volunteer students from Matt Chiurco's class took part in the Saturday event. Many thanks for your kindness!
Volunteer students from Matt Chiurco’s class took part in the Saturday event. Many thanks for your kindness!
More volunteers pose next to the final resting place of Malvern's first mayor, the Rev. George Hardesty. Pictured (left to right) are Matt Chiurco, Frank Chiurco, Doug Angeloni, Charm Woods, Lynn Edwards, and Jason Lombardi.
More volunteers pose next to the final resting place of Malvern’s first mayor, the Rev. George Hardesty. Pictured (left to right) are Matt Chiurco, Frank Chiurco, Doug Angeloni, Charm Woods, Lynn Edwards, and Jason Lombardi.
Before shot. The cemetery is barely visible.
Before shot. The cemetery is barely visible.
The cemetery is barely visible before the clean-up.
The cemetery is barely visible before the clean-up.

Finished Product

Before the clean-up.
Before the clean-up.
Several volunteers included (from left) Doug Angeloni, Jason Lombardi, Charm Woods, and Lynn Edwards.
Several volunteers included (from left) Doug Angeloni, Jason Lombardi, Charm Woods, and Lynn Edwards.
After the clean-up.
After the clean-up.
Two hard-working volunteers pose for a quick snapshot. Frank Chiurco (left) and son Matt Chiurco. Matt spearheaded the clean-up project.
Two hard-working volunteers pose for a quick snapshot. Frank Chiurco (left) and son Matt Chiurco. Matt spearheaded the clean-up project.

Hardesty Cemetery

Several representatives from the Malvern Historical Society took part in the clean-up of the old Hardesty Cemetery this past Saturday. This is in preparation for the upcoming auction of the home and property (includes the cemetery) this coming Saturday, October 15. Credit is extended to Malvern school teacher Matt Chiurco for spearheading the project….thank you!
This hallowed burial ground contains the mortal remains of some of Malvern’s most notable pioneers and founders.
The first documented burial is 1836 with the final internment taking place in 1883. There are a total of 36 known burials, but likely more with unmarked graves. The man who built the old “Hardesty Homestead” to be auctioned in less than one week is buried on these grounds. Said Rev. William Hardesty platted the original village of Troy (respectively today’s Malvern).
Also buried on the grounds are Malvern’s first mayor, first banker, two early Malvern postmasters, and a Carroll County auditor. The grounds also contain the remains of numerous infants and children. Legend has it the grounds contain the remains of two fugitive slaves Hardesty was aiding in their journey to freedom. The slaves perished while in his care and he buried them on his property, as is passed down through Hardesty family remembrances.
The cemetery contains the remains of three Civil War soldiers. Many thanks to Frank Chiurco for doing the honors of placing American flags on those three graves along with Malvern American Legion Post 375 for donating the flags.
This sanctified ground is now presentable to the future owners, to be discovered this Saturday morning. It is hoped they treat the grounds with the respect and reverence it deserves.
Bonnie Newell Chiurco, of Newell Realty and Auctions (who will be in charge of the upcoming sale) writes:
“This Sat we are selling the Kraft property at auction. There is a cemetery on the land with 35 graves. I want to thank our son, Matt & some of his students that came to work over the weekend to clean up the area. They did an awesome job and I want to thank them so much for their help. I’d also like to thank Doug Angeloni, Jason Lombardi, Charm Woods and Lynn Edwards for their help. This group was able to find 32 headstones. My last thanks goes out to my husband, Frank for the many hours he spent there with his tractor & mower making it possible to access the cemetery. Again, I feel we live in the best area in the country where people willingly give of their time to help others.”
It is kindly reminded the burial grounds are on private property and permission must be obtained to view the area.
Thank you to the volunteers who gave of their time and strengths to resurrect an integral piece of Malvern history.

Thank you to Bonnie Chiurco for providing the photos for us to share.

Author: Jason Lombardi

A native of Malvern, Jason's love of history developed at an early age. He became self-appointed caretaker of the Hardesty Cemetery in Malvern at the age of approximately ten-years-old. While researching those interred at the burial ground, Jason made connections with numerous Malvern residents who experienced its history, building a foundational knowledge of historical events and data associated with the village. He served as historian of the Malvern United Methodist Church for a number of years which further perpetuated research of the area. While scouring the community for historical information, Jason connected with Malvern native Mrs. Frances L. (Thomas) Montella. Their joint efforts and common desire to preserve Malvern's past led to the formation of the Malvern Historical Society, Inc. in 1994.

2 thoughts on “Hardesty Cemetery Clean-up”

  1. Very Nice project…. All of you did a wonderful job and should be proud of this contribution to the town….

    Keep up the good work…

    1. Thank you for the thoughtful comment, Dave. The Hardesty Cemetery has been the focus of many restoration/clean-up projects through the years, including Boy Scouts and 4-H. I cared for the cemetery for roughly 15 years while growing up on East Main Street. It is gratifying to see the cemetery presentable for the new owners who recently acquired the home on the property.

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